Champagne

Champagne is a sparkling wine that comes from the Champagne region of northeastern France.

The history of Champagne has seen the wine evolve from being a pale, pinkish still wine to the sparkling wine now associated with the region. The Romans were the first to plant vineyards in this area of northeast France, with the region being cultivated by at least the 5th century, possibly earlier.

Dom Pérignon started with the production of wines in the Champagne region in 1668. He is the inventor of the second fermentation in the bottle what makes him for sure the founder of the Champagne as we know it. Dom Pérignon was also the first winemaker who produced white wine of blue grapes; he also developed the regulated Méthode Traditionelle (before 1994 named the Méthode Champenoise). Besides this, he is also the founder of various techniques for producing sparkling wine as is still known by people.

Sparkling Wines

Méthode Cap Classique

Méthode Cap Classique is the South African version of champagne. MCC is made using the original, bottle fermented process used by the French. This is about as close as the South African wine industry will get to making champagne, every step of the process aside from the grapes, is the real deal. The quality of our grapes coupled with the expertise of our wine makers is such that our MCCs rival some of the best French champagnes.

Prosecco

In Italy, Prosecco is a ubiquitously used wine. Outside Italy, it is most often drunk as an apéritif, much as Champagne is. As with other sparkling wines, Prosecco is served chilled. Unlike Champagne,Prosecco does not ferment in the bottle, and it grows stale with time.

White Wines

Sauvignon Blanc

Sauvignon blanc is a green-skinned grape variety that originates from the Bordeaux region of France. The grape most likely gets its name from the French words sauvage and blanc due to its early origins as an indigenous grape in South West France. It is possibly a descendant of Savagnin.

bowld sauvignon blanc

Chardonnay

Chardonnay is a green-skinned grape variety used in the production of white wine. The variety originated in the Burgundy wine region of eastern France, but is now grown wherever wine is produced, from England to New Zealand.

Bowld Chardonnay

Chenin Blanc

Chenin blanc is a White wine grape variety from the Loire Valley of France. Its high acidity means it can be used to make everything from sparkling wines to well-balanced dessert wines, although it can produce very bland, neutral wines if the vine’s natural vigour is not controlled.

White Varietals

A varietal wine is a wine made primarily from a single named grape variety, and which typically displays the name of that variety on the wine label.

White Blends

The aim of blending is to make a whole wine that is greater than the sum of its parts. Some grape varieties share a great synergy

Rosé

A rosé is a type of wine that incorporates some of the color from the grape skins, but not enough to qualify it as a red wine. It may be the oldest known type of wine, as it is the most straightforward to make with the skin contact method.

Red Wines

Cabernet Sauvignon

Cabernet Sauvignon is one of the world’s most widely recognized red wine grape varieties. It is grown in nearly every major wine producing country among a diverse spectrum of climates from Canada’s Okanagan Valley to Lebanon’s Beqaa Valley.

Merlot

Merlot is a dark blue-coloured wine grape variety, that is used as both a blending grape and for varietal wines. The name Merlot is thought to be a diminutive of merle, the French name for the blackbird.

Shiraz

Syrah, also known as Shiraz, is a dark-skinned grape variety grown throughout the world and used primarily to produce red wine. In 1999, Syrah was found to be the offspring of two obscure grapes from southeastern France, Dureza and Mondeuse Blanche.

Pinotage

Pinotage is a red wine grape that is South Africa’s signature variety. It was cultivated in 1925 as a cross between Pinot noir and Cinsaut.

Pinot Noir

Pinot noir is a red wine grape variety of the species Vitis vinifera. The name may also refer to wines created predominantly from pinot noir grapes. The name is derived from the French words for pine and black. The word pine alludes to the grape variety having tightly clustered, pine cone-shaped bunches of fruit.

Cabernet Franc

Cabernet Franc is one of the major black grape varieties worldwide. It is principally grown for blending with Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot in the Bordeaux style, but can also be vinified alone, as in the Loire’s Chinon.

Red Bordeaux

A Bordeaux wine is any wine produced in the Bordeaux region of southwest France. Bordeaux is centered on the city of Bordeaux, on the Garonne River.

Red Varietals

varietal wine is a wine made primarily from a single named grape variety, and which typically displays the name of that variety on the wine label. Examples of grape varieties commonly used in varietal wines are Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay and Merlot.

Rhone Blends

The southern French region of Rhone is warm and sunny – just like South Africa. This means that Rhone blends are popular here, and can include any of Shiraz, Carignan, Cinsaut, Mourvedre,  Grenache Noir, as well as some of the white grapes Viognier, Roussanne or Marsanne.

Cape Blends

Pinotage could be a unifying element; at the moment Cape Blends include Bordeaux-style blends (Cabernet SauvignonMerlotCabernet Franc,Malbec, and/or Petit Verdot), Rhone-style blends (SyrahGrenache, Mourvedre, Cinsault…), and “Aussie” blends like Cab-Shiraz.

Dessert and Fortified

Defining Dessert and Fortified Wines. … When fortified with alcohol after fermentation (after all the grape sugar has been converted to alcohol), the wines are dry (unless they’re subsequently sweetened). Sherry is the classic example of this process.

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